History of Economic Theories

lecge1217  2021-2022  Louvain-la-Neuve

History of Economic Theories
5 credits
30.0 h
Q2
Teacher(s)
Language
English
Prerequisites

The prerequisite(s) for this Teaching Unit (Unité d’enseignement – UE) for the programmes/courses that offer this Teaching Unit are specified at the end of this sheet.
Main themes
The course will examine: - the link between economic theory and liberalism - Marx's place in the history of economic theories - the relevance of the concept of scientific revolution - the mathematisation of the economy
Aims

At the end of this learning unit, the student is able to :

1 This course on the History of Economic Theories has two objectives. On the one hand, it aims to give students a view of how economic theories have developed, from the birth of Political Economics up to modern times. This should enable students to situate what they have learnt in their foundation courses within a broader framework and to relate it to the questions put by economists from previous generations. This historical approach will also provide an occasion for students to reflect critically on Economic Science, its objectives, methods, etc. They will have, for example, to investigate whether criticisms of economic methods, which tend to criticize its high degree of abstraction and mathematisation, are relevant.
 
Content
This course focuses on the history of economic thought in the period between the XVIII and the XIX century. The aim is to provide students with a critical perspective on economics, by helping them developing a deeper understanding of economics, of its theoretical and methodological evolution over time, and of its policy implications.
Coverage will be selective and mainly focused on Classical Economists and the Marginalist revolution.
Teaching methods
Ex-cathedra lectures
Evaluation methods
Written or oral exam (depending on sanitary conditions).
Bibliography
A. Roncaglia, A Brief History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2017.
R. Heilbroner, Teachings from the Wordly Philosophers, Norton, New York, 1996.
R. Heilbroner, The Worldy Philosophers, 7th edition, Touchstone, New York, 1999.
Additional readings
M. Blaug, Economic Theory in Retrospect, 5th edition, Cambridge University Press, 1996.
T. G. Buchholz, New Ideas from Dead Economists, Plume, New York, 2007.
J. K. Galbraith, Economics in Perspective: A Critical History, Houghton Mifflin, 1987.
A. Roncaglia, The Wealth of Ideas, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2005.
Faculty or entity


Programmes / formations proposant cette unité d'enseignement (UE)

Title of the programme
Sigle
Credits
Prerequisites
Aims
Bachelor in Economics and Management

Minor in Economics

Minor in Economics (open)

Bachelor in Philosophy, Politics and Economics