Supply Chain Management

mlsmm2252  2022-2023  Mons

Supply Chain Management
5.00 credits
30.0 h
Q1
Language
English
Prerequisites
Basic notions of mathematics, probability theory and
statistics.
Main themes
Supply chain management has gained tremendous momentum over the past decades and is rightfully seen as a competitive imperative in today's far-reaching and increasingly more complex supply networks. However, coordinating a supply chain represents a huge challenge,
and requires understanding how integrated supply chains can delight customers, how to overcome adverse supply chain dynamics, how to manage inventory and information, as well as how to preserve superior supplier relationships.
Advancing supply chain management can deliver dramatic results; it can put a company ahead of competition or leave it behind.
In this course, several important concepts and topics will be addressed:
  • Introduction to the supply chain, its main concepts and its importance
  • Strategic supply chain design and facility location
  • Inventory management
  • Information flows in the supply chain
  • Outsourcing, supplier relationships and revenue management
  • New trends in supply chain management
Learning outcomes

At the end of this learning unit, the student is able to :

1 At the end of this course, the student is able to:
  • Explain the importance of supply chain management in today's companies' competitive strategy.
  • Identify the main characteristics of a company's supply chain strategy, in particular related to the main drivers of supply chain performance.
  • Analyze the consistency of a company's supply chain strategy with its competitive strategy and its customer needs.
  • Propose recommendations in the right direction to validate or improve a company's supply chain strategy.
  • Choose and apply the right inventory policy to a particular case, based on structured reasoning.
  • Recognize the impact of other functions and of other stages on a company's supply chain strategy.
 
Content
Nowadays, supply chain management is rightfully seen as a competitive imperative for companies to manage their far-reaching and increasingly more complex supply networks. However, moving on from the old era of functional excellence to state of the art supply chain management practices requires understanding how integrated supply chains can delight customers, how to overcome adverse supply chain dynamics, how to manage inventory and information, as well as how to preserve superior supplier relationships. Supply chain management can put a company ahead of competition or leave it behind.
The course will use a combination of cases from various industries, a simulation exercise, a company visit, lectures and group discussions to introduce the main concepts of supply chain management. It will provide guidelines on questions such as: Why does an integrated view of the supply chain matters? How should companies align their strategy and their supply chain? How to best adapt the supply chain portfolio to a company’s product portfolio? How to apply inventory policies and what are the main trade-offs? How to make good use of information flows? How to manage relationships with suppliers? What are the new trends in supply chain management? What are the impacts of sustainability concerns on the supply chain?
At the end of this course, students should be able to:
  • Explain the importance of supply chain management in companies’ competitive strategy.
  • Identify the main characteristics of a company’s supply chain strategy, in particular related to the main drivers of supply chain performance.
  • Analyze the consistency of a company’s supply chain strategy with its competitive strategy and its customer needs.
  • Propose recommendations in the right direction to validate or improve a company’s supply chain strategy.
  • Choose and apply the right inventory policy to a particular case, based on structured reasoning.
  • Recognize the impact of other functions and of other stages on a company’s supply chain strategy.
Teaching methods
The course will use a combination of cases from various industries, a simulation exercise, a company visit, lectures and group discussions. An important share of the course relies on case studies. The latter have to be read before the class and then serve as a basis for discussion in class, to reveal the key concepts of Supply Chain Management and to provide perspective. Moreover, other tools such as simulation exercises, more formal introductions to the supply chain theory, as well as some glimpse on recent trends in the field are used to introduce the student to supply chain management.
Evaluation methods
The grading aims at evaluating the ability to understand a case study (class participation note and individual assignment) and on the assimilation of the main concepts of Supply Chain Management (written exam).
Other information
Company case studies will be provided in time (prior to the corresponding sessions), in paper version. Slides will be provided in the beginning of each course, in paper version (with some parts hidden to allow for discussion in class). After each course, the slides as well as optional complementary readings will be uploaded on the student-corner.
Bibliography
Main References:
  • Chopra Sunil and Meindl Peter, 2013. Supply Chain Management: Strategy, Planning and Operation, 5th Global Edition. Pearson Education.
  • Nahmias Steven, 2009. Production and Operations Analysis, 6th International Edition. McGraw-Hill/Irwin, New York.
Faculty or entity


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