Ongoing research projects

IMMC

Ongoing research projects in iMMC (August 2020)


This a short description of research projects which are presently under progress in iMMC.
Hereunder, you may select one research direction or choose to apply another filter:

Biomedical engineering

Computational science

Civil and environmental engineering

Dynamical and electromechanical systems

Energy

Fluid mechanics

Processing and characterisation of materials

Chemical engineering

Solid mechanics


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List of projects related to: calphad




Development of high-toughness cryogenic alloys
Researcher: Alvise Miotti Bettanini
Supervisor(s): Pascal Jacques

Materials that can perform at extremely low temperatures are in great demand. Applications span from tanks and pressure vessels for LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) carriers to structural materials in extreme conditions, like the upcoming exploration of Mars. In this context, it is critical to ensure very high toughness, which measures the resistance to crack propagation, at cryogenic temperatures. In this project, the experimental development of Fe-based superalloys is guided by a CALPHAD-based methodology, which allows the calculation of phase stability and phase transformation with computational models in order to reduce the experimental effort and hasten the development cycle of new materials.



Fracture toughness of high entropy alloys
Researcher: Antoine Hilhorst
Supervisor(s): Pascal Jacques, Thomas Pardoen

High entropy alloys (HEAs) are a new family of metallic alloys. In contrast to conventional alloys, HEAs have multiple principal elements e.g. the equiatomic "Cantor" alloy CrMnFeCoNi. Alloys in this range of chemical composition have gathered attention only recently. From what was observed in conventional alloys, it was expected that HEAs microstructure be composed of several intermetallic phases but some systems are surprisingly single phase solid solution. Moreover, such single-phase alloys have excellent mechanical properties. For instance, CrMnFeCoNi possess a large fracture toughness, which increases with decreasing temperature, putting this alloy on par with the current best alloys used for cryogenic applications. As such, the objective of the thesis is to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed macroscopic behavior of such alloys.


The thesis aims to answer several questions such as: What are the mechanisms responsible for the increase in ductility, strength, and fracture toughness with decreasing temperature? What high-throughput methodology would be able to screen the vast range of possible chemical composition of HEAs for high performance alloys?


To understand the deformation mechanisms, several HEAs will be fully characterized from casting to mechanical testing. For the fracture toughness measurements, the essential work of fracture method will be employed as it is best suited for ductile thin sheets than compact tests. Diffusion multiples will be explored as a possible high-throughput method, as the presence of composition gradients allows the simultaneous characterization of a range of composition by techniques such as EDX, EBSD and nano-indentation.