Ongoing research projects

IMMC

Ongoing research projects in iMMC (August 2022)


This a short description of research projects which are presently under progress in iMMC.
Hereunder, you may select one research direction or choose to apply another filter:

Biomedical engineering

Computational science

Civil and environmental engineering

Dynamical and electromechanical systems

Energy

Fluid mechanics

Processing and characterisation of materials

Chemical engineering

Solid mechanics


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List of projects related to: combustion




BEST
Researcher: Véronique Dias
Supervisor(s): Hervé Jeanmart

obtained her PhD at UCLouvain in 2003, then worked as Postdoctoral Researcher at the Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de la Combustion (Faculty of Science). In 2009, she moved to the Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, and since 2012, she has a position of Research Associate. In 2015, she obtained her HDR (Habilitation à Diriger la Recherche) at the Université of Orléans (France).
Her research interests cover the combustion and kinetics of alternative fuels by the elaboration of kinetic models for hydrocarbons and oxygenated species. These projects in combustion include both experimental and numerical parts. They are contributions to the IEA (International Energy Agency) Implementing Agreement for Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction in Combustion.
In 2016-2018, Véronique Dias also worked on a project on energy storage, and more specifically, in chemical form. In the BEST project (2020-2024), she holds the management and coordination that support all the activities to be developed during the project by providing the necessary tools, methods and governing structure.
Since 2018, she has been the IMMC Research Coordinator for European projects on energy transition.



Improvement of gas quality in small-scale biomass gasification facilities through steam injection
Researcher: Arnaud Rouanet
Supervisor(s): Hervé Jeanmart

Biomass, as a renewable fuel, can be converted in a gasifier to produce a synthetic gas that is easier to transport and has a wider range of applications than solid biomass, including bio-fuels, chemicals or energy production.
In order to improve the quality of the produced gases, we will investigate how steam can be used instead of air as the oxidizing agent, to limit the syngas dilution with inert nitrogen and increase its heating value. The project will focus on improving an existing small-scale two-stage gasification unit owned by UCLouvain, on which ad-hoc modifications will be brought and experimental campaigns will be performed.
Theoretical calculations and literature reviews will be performed to confirm and precise the potential for improvement of syngas composition. The design and ideal location of steam injection points will be studied, and experiments will be conducted on the modified gasifier to complement the theoretical calculations. Advanced tools and methods will be used for the characterisation of the syngas composition, to increase the accuracy of the experimental results. Finally, a numerical model of the gasification process will possibly come as complement for a more accurate prediction and confirmation of the experimental results.
This research project will take place in the frame of the project ENERBIO, in collaboration with ULB, UMons and CRA-W.



Developing a low-NOx ammonia burner
Researcher: Charles Lhuillier
Supervisor(s): Francesco Contino

In collaboration with a startup company, the goal of this project is to develop, characterise and optimise an innovative burner adapted ammonia combustion with low nitrogeneous pollutant emissions.



Integrated process for CO2 capture and conversion into valuable products
Researcher: Kamyll Dawn Cocon
Supervisor(s): Patricia Luis Alconero

CO2 has recently become a hot topic in research due concerns of alarming CO2 levels in the atmosphere, and the ongoing shift towards green production processes. These concerns are currently addressed by designing systems capable of CO2 capture and valorization. Enzymes offer an efficient means of CO2 capture under normal conditions. However, they are highly sensitive to temperature as well as pH, and are prone to deactivation. Industrially incorporating enzymes for CO2 capture therefore requires robustifying them against typical industrial conditions. The PhD project hopes to accomplish this by immobilizing the enzymes on membranes. With a plethora of enzymes, an integrated multi-enzymatic membrane system can be designed to produce high-end products as a green alternative to the current production process. The design of the integrated CO2 capture and valorization system will be carried out in four stages: (1) identifying the appropriate cocktail of enzymes, (2) identifying the compatible membrane for the selected enzymes, (3) optimizing the integrated process, (4) accounting for the environmental footprint of the process through life cycle analysis.