Ongoing research projects

IMMC

Ongoing research projects in iMMC (October 2021)


This a short description of research projects which are presently under progress in iMMC.
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Biomedical engineering

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Fluid mechanics

Processing and characterisation of materials

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List of projects related to: fracture mechanics




Coupled mechanical-electrical effects in highly strained Ge thin films
Researcher: Marie-Stéphane Colla
Supervisor(s): Thomas Pardoen

Graduated in chemical and materials science engineering at the Université catholique de Louvain in 2009 (Belgium). Then, under the supervision of Prof. Thomas Pardoen (iMMC) and Prof. Jean-Pierre Raskin (ICTEAM), she accomplished a PhD on the study of the mechanical properties of thin films, more specifically on the plasticity and creep of freestanding nanocrystalline Pd films. The lab-on-chip technique developed previously at the UCL was adapted to deform Pd thin films. After the PhD, she worked for more than two years at the CRM Group in Liège on the development of industrially viable thin film solar cells on steel. From June 2016 to September 2018, she is back at the UCL as a research engineer involved in projects dealing with the understanding of fracture behaviour of high strength steels under a wide range of strain rates.​ In 2018, she received a 'Chargée de recherches - FNRS grant' and is now working on coupled mechanical-electrical effects in highly strained germanium thin films. Germanium is a promising material for optoelectronic device owing to its compatibility with the standard complementary metal-oxyde-semiconductor (CMOS) technology and to the possibility to convert it into a direct bandgap semiconductor by straining it.



MACOBIO (MAtériaux COmposites BIOsourcés)
Researcher: Vincent Destoop
Supervisor(s): Thomas Pardoen

made his PhD on the adhesion of tooth-filling materials to the dentine. He’s now working on composite materials to replace metals in aircraft applications. He takes part to projects studying the mechanical behavior of composite materials (mainly polymer matrix reinforced with long fibers) which are new candidate materials for modern planes. Recently, his research was oriented on biosourced composites. His investigations focus on the bulk, cracking, impact and adhesion properties.



BIODEC, STOCC
Researcher: Audrey Favache
Supervisor(s): Thomas Pardoen

obtained a PhD degree in the domain of process control in 2009 at Université catholique de Louvain (Belgium), after having graduated there as chemical engineer in 2005. Since then, she is working as a "senior" researcher on several applied research projects in collaboration with the industry in the domain of mechanics of materials. More particularly, she is interested in the link between the mechanical properties of the individual components of a complex system and the global mechanical response of this system. She applied this approach to the framework of tribology and contact mechanics for understanding the scratch resistance of coatings and multilayered systems. Her work covers both experimental aspects and finite element simulations.



Renforcement des capacités de RDI des organismes de recherche dans les domaines utiles aux PME
Researcher: Michaël Coulombier
Supervisor(s): Thomas Pardoen

graduated as a material science engineer from UCL in 2006. He finished his PhD in 2012 under the supervision of Prof. Thomas Pardoen (iMMC) and Prof. Jean-Pierre Raskin (ICTEAM) developing a lab on-chip technique for nano-mechanical characterisation of thin films. Since then he has been a research assistant in iMMC involved in various projects dealing with material science, nanomechanical testing and tribology.



Friction stir processing based local damage mitigation and healing in aluminium alloys
Researcher: Matthieu Baudouin Lezaack
Supervisor(s): Aude Simar

Al 7XXX alloys will be characterized before and after friction stir process (FSP) in order to identify the damage mechanisms. The performances of FSPed alloys will be studied by macromechanical testing. Up to now, a 150% increase in ductility was reached by FSP + heat treatments compared to the base 7475 Al material. Then a numerical model will catch the 7XXX aluminium behavior in a close future.



Fracture toughness of high entropy alloys
Researcher: Antoine Hilhorst
Supervisor(s): Pascal Jacques, Thomas Pardoen

High entropy alloys (HEAs) are a new family of metallic alloys. In contrast to conventional alloys, HEAs have multiple principal elements e.g. the equiatomic "Cantor" alloy CrMnFeCoNi. Alloys in this range of chemical composition have gathered attention only recently. From what was observed in conventional alloys, it was expected that HEAs microstructure be composed of several intermetallic phases but some systems are surprisingly single phase solid solution. Moreover, such single-phase alloys have excellent mechanical properties. For instance, CrMnFeCoNi possess a large fracture toughness, which increases with decreasing temperature, putting this alloy on par with the current best alloys used for cryogenic applications. As such, the objective of the thesis is to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed macroscopic behavior of such alloys.


The thesis aims to answer several questions such as: What are the mechanisms responsible for the increase in ductility, strength, and fracture toughness with decreasing temperature? What high-throughput methodology would be able to screen the vast range of possible chemical composition of HEAs for high performance alloys?


To understand the deformation mechanisms, several HEAs will be fully characterized from casting to mechanical testing. For the fracture toughness measurements, the essential work of fracture method will be employed as it is best suited for ductile thin sheets than compact tests. Diffusion multiples will be explored as a possible high-throughput method, as the presence of composition gradients allows the simultaneous characterization of a range of composition by techniques such as EDX, EBSD and nano-indentation.



On a chip fracture mechanics test method
Researcher: Sahar Jaddi
Supervisor(s): Thomas Pardoen

The aim of this research is to develop a new testing method based on an-on-chip concept to measure the fracture toughness of freestanding submicron films. This device consists of two major components, a notched specimen and two actuators. When the test structure is released by etching the sacrificial layer, the two actuators contract, this in turn loads the specimen in traction. In order to define the stress intensity factor expression, which is given by this new model, analytical analysis and finite element simulations must be performed in addition to the experimental part, which is based on the microfabrication techniques. Silicon nitride, silicon oxide and metallic glass thin films will be studied during this work. The major goal of this model is to extract fracture toughness of 2D materials like graphene.



Electromechanical properties of thin films
Researcher: Farzaneh Bahrami
Supervisor(s): Thomas Pardoen

The production of Graphene/h-BN heterostructures and the investiong of their microelectromechanical properties, the production of origami and kirigami stacks of Graphene and h-BN, the raman spectroscopy, SEM, TEM AFM and nanoindentation will be used