Senior Researchers

TFL

Research Associates

Véronique Dias obtained her PhD at UCL in 2003, then worked as Postdoctoral Researcher at the Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de la Combustion (Faculty of Science). In 2009, she moved to the Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, and since 2012, she has a position of Research Associate. In 2015, she obtained her HDR (Habilitation à Diriger la Recherche) at the Université of Orléans (France).

Her research interests cover the combustion and kinetics of alternative fuels by the elaboration of kinetic models for hydrocarbons and oxygenated species. These projects in combustion include both experimental and numerical parts.

Since 2016, Véronique Dias also works on a project on energy storage, and more specifically, in chemical form.


Matthieu Duponcheel obtained his PhD at UCL in 2009, then worked as a F.R.S-FNRS Postdoctoral Researcher and, since 2011, he has a position as Research Engineer. He works on externally funded projects in the domains of fluid mechanics, aerodynamics, heat transfer and thermodynamics. This projects include large European or Regional projects as well as smaller industrial contracts. He is interested in theoretical, numerical and experimental activities. Among other projects, he has been working on aircraft wakes (with Prof. Winckelmans), wind turbine aerodynamics (Prof Chatelain and Prof Winckelmans), the experimental characterisation of a scaled water turbine (with Prof H. Jeanmart), development of an airship demonstrator (Prof Chatelain and Prof Winckelmans), flashing two-phase choked flows (with Prof. Bartosiewicz) and turbulent heat transfer in liquid metal (with Prof. Bartosiewicz).
 


Philippe Parmentier obtained his PhD at UCLouvain in 2018 after a master in Mechanical Engineering at the Université catholique de Louvain in 2012 and a master in Aerospace Engineering at the Institut Supérieur de l’Aéronautique et de l’Espace (ISAE-Supaero, Toulouse, France) in 2012. He then started his PhD at iMMC/TFL in the field of CFD for external compressible flows past bodies. His research focuses on the development of a hybrid methodology allowing to combine the benefits of an Eulerian compressible solver and a compressible Vortex Particle-Mesh (VPM) solver. The combination of these two approaches would allow studying, more efficiently and more precisely, problems in which compressibility effects and wakes are of importance : e.g. CROR (Contra Rotating Open Rotor) or helicopter blades.


Jean-Marie Seynhaeve

 

 

 

Postdoctoral fellows

Esteban Hufstedler obtained his PhD in aeronautics from Caltech in 2017, where he experimentally studied unsteady aerodynamics and vortex-wing interaction. He is currently working with Prof. Chatelain to apply agent-based machine learning techniques to the control of aircraft and wind turbines. This includes both the creation of simplified models of fluid flows and the implementation of machine learning algorithms.


Haddy Mbuyi Katshiatshia ”Mukole” was born in Kolwezi, province of Lualaba (ex-Katanga) in the South-East part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).
 

After his primary and secondary schools at “Mixte OUA2” and “Institut Furaha” located in Kipushi, respectively; he reached Kinshasa (capital of DRC located at its West part) for the university studies at the Faculty of Sciences, Department of Chemistry at the Université de Kinshasa (Unikin) in 2003. He obtained his ”Bachelor in Sciences”, group of ”Chemistry” in 2008.
 

From 2008 to 2010, He has done his ”DEA” (Diplôme d’Etudes Approfondies) in Energetic Systems and Biofuels at the same University, Faculty of Polytechnics in collaboration with the faculties of Sciences and Pharmaceutical Sciences. This study was supported by the wallonia region (Belgium) via CUD (Commission interUniversitaire de Developpement) in the program called: KIN02/Energetic Systems and Biofuels.
 

He reached the Université catholique de Louvain in september 2011 for a research internship at the Thermodynamics and Fluid mechanics (TFL) pole of the institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil engineering (iMMC). In January 2012, he began his Ph.D. in Combustion. The research topic is to perform an experimental setup allowing to study the combustion of high boiling temperature oxygenated compounds (esters) by analyzing flat one-dimensional laminar flames at low pressure. Due to the experimental data, a detailed kinetic model is elaborated to improve its validity in the experimental conditions.

From December 2011 to February 2016, he was a ”Teaching and Research Assistant” at the Faculty of Polytechnics of the Université de Kinshasa. He finished his PhD studies in March 2016 with the thesis entitled: “Characterization of biofuels combustion by analyzing flames at low pressure: Ethyl Valerate flames” supervised by Professor Hervé Jeanmart/TFL/iMMC/UCL.
From March 2016 still now, He is An Associate Professor at the Faculty of Polytechnics, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. He focused his research on “Combustion” and “New and Renewable Energies”.


Maud Moens obtained her PhD from UCL in September 2018, where she developed a numerical tool for accurate and still efficient unsteady wind farm simulations. This was achieved by using Large Eddy Simulation on coarse meshes, combined with an Actuator Disk method for the wind turbine model. She is currently working with Pr. Philippe Chatelain on the WakeOpColl project. This project proposes to apply agent-based machine learning techniques to the control of aircraft and wind turbines. She will investigate such control strategies at a wind farm scale by using the high fidelity numerical tool she developed during her PhD.


James Riehl obtained his PhD at the University of California, Santa Barbara in Control Systems Engineering. His research focuses on the analysis and control of complex systems of interconnected agents. At UCL, he is working with Prof. Philippe Chatelain and Prof. Julien Hendrickx on projects involving how groups of agents can coordinate to achieve efficient performance in turbulent flows, with applications to formation flight and windfarm optimization.