IRES Lunch Seminar

The IRES Lunch Seminar is an informal forum where researchers present their work in progress in details and receive criticism and feedback from colleagues. Presentations on the blackboard are also welcome. PhD students entering the job market this year are strongly encouraged to present their job market paper.

The Macro Group provides sandwiches. Whether you would like a sandwich or not, please register by the Friday before the meeting at https://doodle.com/poll/ykb4t3a9ekwpeaf6

Contact:

Annalisa Frigo (annalisa.frigo@uclouvain.be)

Luca Pensieroso (luca.pensieroso@uclouvain.be)

 

Meetings are in room d-109, from 12:45 to 14:00

Programme - 2018-2019

 

Programme Fall 2018

October

October 2nd: Marc Goni (University of Vienna), “Landed Elites and Education Provision in England: Evidence from School Boards, 1871-99”.

October 16th: Michel De Vroey (IRES) “The History of Macroeconomics under the Sense of the Marshall-Walras Divide”.

October 23rd: Gonzague Vannoorenberghe (IRES), “A Theory Of New Trade Agreements'', with Mathieu Parenti (ULB)”.

October 30th: Cristina Manea (Pompeu Fabra University), “Collateral Constrained Firms and Monetary Policy”.

November

November 6th: Andreas Backhaus (CEPS and LMU Munich), "Fading Legacies: Human Capital in the Aftermath of the Partitions of Poland"

November 13th: Cyrille Dossougoin (CORE-LFIN), “Sovereign Risk Spillovers through Endogenous Cross-Border Financial Linkages” – Job Market Paper.

November 20th: Manuel Oechslin (Lucerne University), “Smaller Measurement Errors, Better Economic Policies?”, with Johannes Binswanger.

November 27th: Koen Declerq (IRES), “Gender Differences in Applying for STEM Programs: Evidence from a Policy Shift in Hungary”, with J. Ghysels and J. Varga.

December

December 11th: Romain Wacziarg (UCLA), Change and Persistence in the Age of Modernization: Saint-Germain-d’Anxure, 1730-1895” with Guillaume Blanc

January

January 15th:

January 22nd: Hamzeh Arabzadeh (RWTH University) "Opportunistic governments, budget deficits and wage setting centralization"

January 29th: Esther Delesalle (IRES), "The Impact of the Universal Primary Education Program on Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Tanzania".

Programme Spring 2019

 

February

February 5th: Stefanija Veljanoska (IRES) “Agricultural Policy and Migration in Malawi” with Giuseppe Maggio

February 12th:

February 19th: Nouhoum Touré (Paris 2) “Culture, Institutions and the Industrialization Process”

February 26th: Luca Pensieroso (IRES) “The Rise of a Mainstream in Economics” with Michel De Vroey

March

March 5th: Alexandros Theloudis (LISER Luxembourg and UCL), “Family Time Allocation Over the Last Half Century”

March 12th:

March 19th: Mathilde Valero (AMSE) “Household Income Shocks and Sibling Composition: Evidence from Rural Tanzania”

March 26th: Roland Winkler (University of Antwerp), "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: International Evidence from Historical Data"

April

April 2nd: Erica Perego (CEPII), "World Interest Rate Shocks And Macroeconomic Adjustment In Commodity Producing Countries: The Role Of Storage" with Vincent Bodart.

April 9th & April 16th: spring vacation.

April 23rd: Lorenzo Trimarchi (UNamur), "Trade Policy and the China Syndrome"

April 30th: Pauline Morault (IRES), "How Did Protestantism Affect the Network of European Universities in the Early Modern Period?" with David de la Croix. .

May

May 7th:Khushboo Surana (KU Leuven), "Stable Marriage And Children: Child Custody And Intrahousehold Sharing"

May 14th: Christian Kiedaisch (UNamur), "Inequality and Demand-Driven Innovation: Evidence from International Patent Applications", with Sabrina Dorn and Florian Seliger.

May 20th : Javier García-Cicco (Central bank of Argentina), "Revisiting the Exchange Rate Pass Through: A General Equilibrium Perspective"exceptionally at MORE51 at 1:15 pm

May 21st: Lingwei Wu ( Univeristy of Bonn), “The economic motives for foot-binding”

May 28th: William Parienté (IRES), TBA

June

June 11th: Daniele Verdini (IRES), "Demand Shocks, Sector-level Externalities, and the Evolution of the Comparative Advantage"