News for libst

The Chromosome waltz

To generate our reproductive cells (the gametes), our cells use a double division called meiosis. It aims to create male or female gametes that consist of 23 chromosomes, not 46 chromosomes like the rest of our cells. This is so that these gametes can pair with a gamete of the opposite sex and...
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Cancer cells deactivate their ‘Velcro’ to go on the...

Cancer cells remain clumped together via a sort of ‘Velcro’ which allows them to adhere to each other wherever they appear. In order for cancer cells to leave a tumour and spread throughout the body during metastatic processes, cancer cells must reduce their adhesion and increase their...
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Mechanobiology: what makes bacterial pathogens so stiff?

Bacteria are surrounded by mechanically rigid cell envelopes, which play important roles in controlling cellular processes like growth, division, adhesion as well as resistance to drugs and environmental stresses. In the prototypical pathogen Escherichia coli, it has long been believed that...
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Lock the door on coronavirus

How does the new coronavirus enter our cells and how do we keep it from entering? The team of David Alsteens (LIBST) will tackle these two questions with the help of state-of-the-art equipment, the atomic force microscope, and expertise on the interactions between viruses and their host cells....
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Perverting cell-to-cell communication in streptococci

Bacteria have developed cell-to-cell communication systems to exchange information in order to coordinate a population response toward various stimuli. For instance, the ComR-ComS system is broadly present in streptococci and deeply studied in Pr. Pascal Hols´ lab and its postdoctoral...
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