News for libst

Unravelling the molecular secrets of yeast sexuality

In a paper published in Communications Biology, a LIBST group and the Lipke team (USA) - use single-cell fluidic force microscopy to investigate the molecular binding mechanisms of sexual agglutinins in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.They report that mechanical tension enhances the...
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FASD thanks LIBST for its support during the coronavirus...

Thanks to the support of our institute, the "Fédération de l'aide et des soins à Domicile (FASD)" has been able to equip its "courageous bees" which, every day, visit the homes of many people, including the most isolated and particularly vulnerable to the Coronavirus. It is in part thanks to...
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Bacterial pathogens with a strong grip

During pathogenesis, bacterial pathogens adhere to host surfaces through specific receptor-ligand bonds that experience strong hydrodynamic forces. It is commonly accepted that such adhesion complexes slip apart more easily under increasing external shear ("slip bonds"). However, it has become...
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Our DHC, Emmanuelle Charpentier, wins the Nobel Prize in...

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier, Doctor honoris causa of the LIBST in 2018, and to Jennifer Doudna, two geneticists who have developed "molecular scissors" capable of modifying human genes, a revolutionary breakthrough. The award is given to them for...
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The Chromosome waltz

To generate our reproductive cells (the gametes), our cells use a double division called meiosis. It aims to create male or female gametes that consist of 23 chromosomes, not 46 chromosomes like the rest of our cells. This is so that these gametes can pair with a gamete of the opposite sex and...
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